5 Top Facts You Should Know About Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is surrounded by interesting facts: The disease affects women three times more often than men. Children often outgrow juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, yet the disease is chronic and progressive in adults. And most people don’t know that cigarette smoking is the strongest environmental risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis.

Of all those facts, however, none are in the top five list put together by the team at Prolete Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine in Milford, Connecticut. Here are the most important facts you should know about rheumatoid arthritis.

1. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition

Your immune system normally identifies and attacks bacteria, viruses, and other organisms that make you sick. When you have an autoimmune condition, the immune system mistakenly identifies part of your own body as an invader and mounts an attack against that tissue.

Rheumatoid arthritis develops when your immune system harms the synovium, a tissue that lines the inner surface of your joints. As a result, the lining becomes inflamed and you develop swelling, pain, and stiffness.

2. Rheumatoid arthritis has a unique set of symptoms

The joint pain and stiffness caused by rheumatoid arthritis are classic symptoms similar to those found in osteoarthritis. But rheumatoid arthritis has unique symptoms that set it apart from osteoarthritis, such as:

By comparison, osteoarthritis causes morning stiffness that typically lasts 30 minutes or less.

3. Medication is essential for preventing joint deformities

Joint inflammation appears at the start of rheumatoid arthritis and doesn’t improve without medication. Ongoing inflammation changes the bone, leading to excessive bone erosion and joint deformities — a hallmark trait of rheumatoid arthritis.

Today, we have new medications called disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic response modifiers that are engineered to protect your joints. These medications stop the inflammatory cascade and prevent deformities.

4. Rheumatoid arthritis causes body-wide symptoms

The inflammation that begins in your joints can spread throughout your body, causing a wide range of symptoms depending on the part of the body affected. Body-wide problems affect about 40% of all patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Some of the most common problems include:

Rheumatoid arthritis is also associated with problems affecting your kidneys, salivary glands, nerves, and bone marrow.

5. Exercise should be part of your treatment plan

You may not feel like exercising when your joints are painful, swollen, and stiff, but physical activity is one of the best ways to:

While exercise is vital, it’s also important to know how long you can safely exercise and what type of exercise you can perform without triggering a flare-up. With our extensive experience in physical therapy and rehabilitation, we can develop an exercise plan that fits your lifestyle and works for your stage of rheumatoid arthritis.

To learn more about treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, call Prolete Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine or schedule an appointment online today.

You Might Also Enjoy...

All About Meniere's Disease: Signs and Treatments

Meniere's disease seriously disrupts your life by causing sudden vertigo that lasts 20 minutes or longer. Though there's no cure, you can overcome your symptoms with the right treatment. Read on to learn how to overcome the problem.

Dry Needling for Fibromyalgia: What to Expect

Fibromyalgia causes extreme bodywide pain and muscle cramps that make getting out of bed or walking seem like impossible tasks. If you struggle with fibromyalgia, dry needling can help ease your pain. Here’s what you should know about how it works.

Is Exercising on Your Own Part of Physical Therapy?

Physical therapy helps you heal, regain maximum health, and get back to the daily life you enjoy. But you only have physical therapy a few times each week. To fully recover and maintain your results, you need to exercise on your own at home.

How to Manage Facet Syndrome

Many people haven’t heard of facet syndrome, but it’s one of the most common causes of chronic lower back and neck pain. When it comes to managing facet syndrome and easing the pain, the experts recommend physical therapy and rehabilitation.

4 Health Benefits of Dry Needling

Anyone who has experienced the pain of a knotted muscle also knows that it can be nearly impossible to make the knot relax. There’s a solution to that problem called dry needling, a safe technique that quickly eases your pain and restores movement.

Signs of a Brain Aneurysm

An estimated 3% of Americans have an aneurysm — whether they know it or not. You can protect your health by learning the signs of a brain aneurysm. That’s your best chance for seeking help before it ruptures and causes a stroke.